Carbon dating jesus shroud

This is what Jesus actually looked like and is an original photo of Jesus, the real face of Jesus.

In modern language it will be a 'Jesus Selfie', the world's first selfie taken by Jesus himself The Shroud of Turin is an ancient Jewish burial cloth believed by millions to be the burial cloth of Jesus Christ.

The results provide conclusive evidence that the linen of the Shroud of Turin is mediaeval.

The Shroud of Turin , which many people believe was used to wrap Christ's body, bears detailed front and back images of a man who appears to have suffered whipping and crucifixion.

1 - Department of Geosciences, 2 - Department of Physics, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721, USA 3 - Research Laboratory for Archaeology and History of Art, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX1 3QJ, UK 4 - Institut für Mittelenergiephysik, ETH-Hönggerberg, CH-8093 Zürich, Switzerland 5 - Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory, Columbia University, Palisades, New York 10964, USA 6 - Research Laboratory, British Museum, London WC1B 3DG, UK Very small samples from the Shroud of Turin have been dated by accelerator mass spectrometry in laboratories at Arizona, Oxford and Zurich.

As Controls, three samples whose ages had been determined independently were also dated.

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The Shroud of Turin is the most researched piece of cloth in the history of mankind, and yet, no one has been able to offer an explanation of how such a perfect photographic image could be formed on an ancient linen cloth.

It was first displayed at Lirey in France in the 1350s and subsequently passed into the hands of the Dukes of Savoy.

After many journeys the shroud was finally brought to Turin in 1578 where, in 1694, it was placed in the royal chapel of Turin Cathedral in a specially designed shrine.

Photography of the shroud by Secondo Pia in 1898 indicated that the image resembled a photographic 'negative' and represents the first modern study.

Subsequently the shroud was made available for scientific examination, first in 19 by a committee appointed by Cardinal Michele Pellegrino .